Where Does Surimi Come From?

After being washed with water, filtered, and combined with cryoprotectants, surimi is a stable form of the myofibrillar protein that is derived from fish flesh that has been mechanically deboned.

How is surimi made?

The meat of white-fleshed fish with a lean, white flesh, such as pollock, is ground into a paste-like consistency and used to produce surimi. After that, the gelatinous paste can be mixed with a number of other ingredients to create fake crab, fake lobster, and other imitation seafood.

What is surimi called in the US?

Surimi. The imitation crab flesh product is the surimi kind that is sold the most frequently in Western markets. In the United States, this kind of product is frequently marketed and sold under the names krab, imitation crab, and mock crab. In Commonwealth nations, however, it is more commonly known as seafood sticks, crab sticks, fish sticks, seafood highlighter, or seafood extender.

Is surimi fish or meat?

After the paste has been seasoned and formed into sticks or rolls, it is then sliced to the proper length before being packaged. It is true that surimi contains fish flesh, which classifies it as a sort of seafood; nevertheless, in the majority of nations, it is illegal for surimi to be branded as seafood because of its composition.